Leonora Carrington 1917 - 2011

She died Wednesday, aged 94, in Mexico. I took these images in 2008, my last trip to Mexico and fell in love with her art immediately. I found them completely by chance, walking Avenida Federale, on my way to the Museo Nacional de Antropologia in Mexico City.

Read more about her here

(via detailsdetales)

exvol:

Jeremy Olsen

If photographs help build collective outrage about violence, war, colonialism and genocide, they may also be helping to dismantle international norms. The one consistent fact about the horrifying images that have come out of Syria over the past 21 / 2 years is that in many cases, we don’t know who made them and what they depict. All we see are decontextualized cruelty and misery. Cynicism creeps in, and there is a natural tendency to push the images away as a kind of insoluble puzzle.

Our own government has exacerbated this photographic and moral crisis. The Iraq war was sold to the American people in part with carefully annotated satellite photos that purported to show evidence of weapons of mass destruction. Those images were misread or misrepresented, and when their verity dissolved, perhaps some of our fear of such weapons dissolved with it, too. When torture, as morally reprehensible as the use of chemical weapons, became official U.S. policy, cloaked in euphemisms about “enhanced interrogation” and “stress positions,” another red line was crossed in our understanding of international norms. Media organizations, including The Washington Post, kept many of the worst torture images from Abu Ghraib out of wide circulation, and the few that did make it through the rigors of self-censorship, we were assured, confirmed only some surreal, Gothic anomaly. Torture looked like late-night frat games, not a deadly policy of abuse.

So it is little wonder that Americans are uninterested in engaging with images of suffering children in Syria and unconcerned about the introduction of chemical weapons into the Syrian conflict. Long after she called for an ecology of images, Sontag despaired of the idea. “There isn’t going to be an ecology of images,” she wrote in “Regarding the Pain of Others.” There is no way “to ration horror, to keep fresh its ability to shock. And the horrors themselves are not going to abate.”

That is where we are now, in an ecosystem of images and an ecosystem of international decency that have been irremediably polluted.

guernicamag:

"Lore has it that audience members panicked when the life-sized locomotive came throttling toward them on the screen of the 1896 Lumiere brothers’ film The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Station. But in 2013, audiences remain placid as they watch a tank barreling through the narrow street of a ravaged Syrian city. Casual observers of a reality recorded anonymously on cell phones and iPads, they witness the war over social media.

"However disparate these images may seem, they come together in the work of Czech artist Tomáš Svoboda. In Filmu uz se nebojim, or Not Afraid of Film Anymore, sequences from both the Lumieres’ famous early work and from the contemporary, unnamed video from Syria form the basis of an installation mounted at Jeleni Gallery in Prague this past November.”

Shooting Film, by Charlotta Kotik - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)
standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)
standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)
standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)
standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)
standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)
standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)
standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)
standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)
standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).
GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)

standwithpalestine:

Over 100 unarmed Palestinian civilians including women and children were systematically murdered when terrorist Zionist groups Irgun Zevai Leumi and Lehi entered the village of Deir Yassin near Jerusalem on April 9, 1948. Never forget their suffering and never forget that the creation of the state of Israel was faciliated by the ethnic cleansing of Palestine (which still continues today).

GIFs: Occupation 101 (2006)

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

newyorker:

Richard Renaldi’s early-morning photographs capture the way the city feels after staying out all night. Take a look: http://nyr.kr/1gY7Rsq

Above: Marcos, 2012.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

Intimate Portraits of Bees
by Sam Droege Intimate Portraits of Bees
by Sam Droege Intimate Portraits of Bees
by Sam Droege Intimate Portraits of Bees
by Sam Droege Intimate Portraits of Bees
by Sam Droege
It’s rare to see mainstream news media reports on Xinjiang, China’s western borderland region, that do not invoke “turbulent,” “restive,” “unstable” or some variation. The area has long been the site of ethnic tensions between the majority Han Chinese and the Uighurs, China’s Turkic-speaking Muslim minority. But tight government controls on information and access make reporting on such clashes and protests, as well as everyday life, exceedingly difficult.
This contrast is what makes Wang Qing’s series “Rituals in Life” all the more remarkable. Photographed over a span of seven years, the series shows the daily experiences and rituals of several ancient Uighur villages near Turpan, the desert oasis that was once a flourishing trade center on the historic Silk Road.

It’s rare to see mainstream news media reports on Xinjiang, China’s western borderland region, that do not invoke “turbulent,” “restive,” “unstable” or some variation. The area has long been the site of ethnic tensions between the majority Han Chinese and the Uighurs, China’s Turkic-speaking Muslim minority. But tight government controls on information and access make reporting on such clashes and protests, as well as everyday life, exceedingly difficult.
This contrast is what makes Wang Qing’s series “Rituals in Life” all the more remarkable. Photographed over a span of seven years, the series shows the daily experiences and rituals of several ancient Uighur villages near Turpan, the desert oasis that was once a flourishing trade center on the historic Silk Road.

It’s rare to see mainstream news media reports on Xinjiang, China’s western borderland region, that do not invoke “turbulent,” “restive,” “unstable” or some variation. The area has long been the site of ethnic tensions between the majority Han Chinese and the Uighurs, China’s Turkic-speaking Muslim minority. But tight government controls on information and access make reporting on such clashes and protests, as well as everyday life, exceedingly difficult.
This contrast is what makes Wang Qing’s series “Rituals in Life” all the more remarkable. Photographed over a span of seven years, the series shows the daily experiences and rituals of several ancient Uighur villages near Turpan, the desert oasis that was once a flourishing trade center on the historic Silk Road.

It’s rare to see mainstream news media reports on Xinjiang, China’s western borderland region, that do not invoke “turbulent,” “restive,” “unstable” or some variation. The area has long been the site of ethnic tensions between the majority Han Chinese and the Uighurs, China’s Turkic-speaking Muslim minority. But tight government controls on information and access make reporting on such clashes and protests, as well as everyday life, exceedingly difficult.
This contrast is what makes Wang Qing’s series “Rituals in Life” all the more remarkable. Photographed over a span of seven years, the series shows the daily experiences and rituals of several ancient Uighur villages near Turpan, the desert oasis that was once a flourishing trade center on the historic Silk Road.

It’s rare to see mainstream news media reports on Xinjiang, China’s western borderland region, that do not invoke “turbulent,” “restive,” “unstable” or some variation. The area has long been the site of ethnic tensions between the majority Han Chinese and the Uighurs, China’s Turkic-speaking Muslim minority. But tight government controls on information and access make reporting on such clashes and protests, as well as everyday life, exceedingly difficult.
This contrast is what makes Wang Qing’s series “Rituals in Life” all the more remarkable. Photographed over a span of seven years, the series shows the daily experiences and rituals of several ancient Uighur villages near Turpan, the desert oasis that was once a flourishing trade center on the historic Silk Road.

It’s rare to see mainstream news media reports on Xinjiang, China’s western borderland region, that do not invoke “turbulent,” “restive,” “unstable” or some variation. The area has long been the site of ethnic tensions between the majority Han Chinese and the Uighurs, China’s Turkic-speaking Muslim minority. But tight government controls on information and access make reporting on such clashes and protests, as well as everyday life, exceedingly difficult.
This contrast is what makes Wang Qing’s series “Rituals in Life” all the more remarkable. Photographed over a span of seven years, the series shows the daily experiences and rituals of several ancient Uighur villages near Turpan, the desert oasis that was once a flourishing trade center on the historic Silk Road.

It’s rare to see mainstream news media reports on Xinjiang, China’s western borderland region, that do not invoke “turbulent,” “restive,” “unstable” or some variation. The area has long been the site of ethnic tensions between the majority Han Chinese and the Uighurs, China’s Turkic-speaking Muslim minority. But tight government controls on information and access make reporting on such clashes and protests, as well as everyday life, exceedingly difficult.

This contrast is what makes Wang Qing’s series “Rituals in Life” all the more remarkable. Photographed over a span of seven years, the series shows the daily experiences and rituals of several ancient Uighur villages near Turpan, the desert oasis that was once a flourishing trade center on the historic Silk Road.

ambroisetezenas:

Paris Photo with Galerie Mélanie Rio / stand A 12

14.17 nov 2013  Grand Palais

showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan
showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan
showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan
showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan
showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan
showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan
showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan
showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan
showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan
showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“
- Shane Koyczan

showslow:

"I sit before flowers hoping they will train me in the art of opening up.“

- Shane Koyczan

(via staceythinx)

colinquinn:

Zack Dougherty