Our Mothers are Always Dressed in Black by Ivan Milev

Maaloula by Louay Kayyali

gentlewave:

Jessie Arms Botke (1883-1971): Sulphur Crested Cockatoos, 1942, details unknown, source: wiki.cultured.com.

(via detailsdetales)

Salatin El Tarab Orchestra Arabian Classics
Aleppo Traditional music ( Aleppo Quedoods )
Syrian folk.

During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents.
 Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. 
Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. 
In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”
Photos by 
Peter Aaron During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents.
 Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. 
Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. 
In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”
Photos by 
Peter Aaron During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents.
 Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. 
Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. 
In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”
Photos by 
Peter Aaron During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents.
 Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. 
Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. 
In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”
Photos by 
Peter Aaron During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents.
 Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. 
Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. 
In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”
Photos by 
Peter Aaron

During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents.

Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track.

Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict.

In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”

Photos by 

Peter Aaron

nemfrog:

Six animal-headed demons or jinn, all (except the blue elephant-headed demons) snapping their fingers. From a copy of ‘Ajā’ib al-makhlūqāt wa-gharā’ib al-mawjūdāt (Marvels of Things Created and Miraculous Aspects of Things Existing) by al-Qazwīnī (d. 1283/682). Neither the copyist nor illustrator is named, and the copy is undated. The nature of paper, script, ink, illumination, and illustrations suggest that it was produced in provincial Mughal India, possibly the Punjab, in the 17th century.

(via confessionsofamichaelstipe)

“The older I get, the more I see how women are described as having gone mad, when what they’ve actually become is knowledgeable and powerful and fucking furious.”

thenewinquiry:

"…That the answer to the problems of the last three weeks can be solved by simply voting in new people (and they better be Democrats, otherwise they deserve what’s coming to them).

This discourse is wrapped in the language of concern and the language of the ally. That makes it all the more dangerous.

It is dangerous because in a world where Black college graduates are on equal economic footing with whites with a high school education, where no one can actually tell us how many unarmed Black people are killed every year by law enforcement, and where walking down the street has become cause for everything from manhandling to murder at the hands of your friendly local law enforcement officer, nothing short of a revolution is necessary to fix wrongs on this magnitude. Nothing short of a big-ass reset button on this society is needed. The Ferguson barber who told theGuardian that “this is a revo-fucking-lution” understood that.The Kerner Commission understood this when their 1968 report (troublesome as it was on certain accounts) recognized that looting and property destruction was committed not because of wanton thuggery, but because those businesses were a constant reminder of how capitalism had failed the offending parties and their neighbors.

But the politics of least resistance is what works for today’s liberals…”

celer-et-audax:

The Austro-Hungarian SMS Szent Istvan capsizes after being struck by an Italian torpedo, 10 June 1918

celer-et-audax:

The Austro-Hungarian SMS Szent Istvan capsizes after being struck by an Italian torpedo, 10 June 1918

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

theyoungradical:

theneighbourhoodsuperhero:



Omar Khadr, a sixteen year old Guantanamo Bay detainee weeps uncontrollably, clutching at his face and hair as he calls out for his mother to save him from his torment. “Ya Ummi, Ya Ummi (Oh Mother, Oh Mother),” he wails repeatedly, hauntingly with each breath he takes.

The surveillance tapes, released by Khadr’s defence, show him left alone in an interrogation room for a “break” after he tried complaining to CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service) officers about his poor health due to insufficient medical attention. Ignoring his complaints and trying to get him to make false confessions, the officers get frustrated with the sixteen year old’s tears and tell him to get himself together by the time they come back from their break.
“You don’t care about me. Nobody cares about me,” he sobs to them.
The tapes show how the officers manipulated Khadr into thinking that they were helping him because they were also Canadian and how they taunted him with the prospect of home (Canada), (good) food, and familial reunion.
Khadr, a Canadian, was taken into US custody at the age of fifteen, tortured and refused medical attention because he wouldn’t attest to being a member of Al Qaeda, even though he was shot three times in the chest and had shrapnel embedded in his eyes and right shoulder. As a result, Khadr’s left eye is now permanently blind, the vision in his right eye is deteriorating, he develops severe pain in his right shoulder when the temperature drops, and he suffers from extreme nightmares.
He has been incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay since 2002, suffering extremely harsh interrogations and torture (methods), and is now 25 years old.


27 now, and still imprisoned
theyoungradical:

theneighbourhoodsuperhero:



Omar Khadr, a sixteen year old Guantanamo Bay detainee weeps uncontrollably, clutching at his face and hair as he calls out for his mother to save him from his torment. “Ya Ummi, Ya Ummi (Oh Mother, Oh Mother),” he wails repeatedly, hauntingly with each breath he takes.

The surveillance tapes, released by Khadr’s defence, show him left alone in an interrogation room for a “break” after he tried complaining to CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service) officers about his poor health due to insufficient medical attention. Ignoring his complaints and trying to get him to make false confessions, the officers get frustrated with the sixteen year old’s tears and tell him to get himself together by the time they come back from their break.
“You don’t care about me. Nobody cares about me,” he sobs to them.
The tapes show how the officers manipulated Khadr into thinking that they were helping him because they were also Canadian and how they taunted him with the prospect of home (Canada), (good) food, and familial reunion.
Khadr, a Canadian, was taken into US custody at the age of fifteen, tortured and refused medical attention because he wouldn’t attest to being a member of Al Qaeda, even though he was shot three times in the chest and had shrapnel embedded in his eyes and right shoulder. As a result, Khadr’s left eye is now permanently blind, the vision in his right eye is deteriorating, he develops severe pain in his right shoulder when the temperature drops, and he suffers from extreme nightmares.
He has been incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay since 2002, suffering extremely harsh interrogations and torture (methods), and is now 25 years old.


27 now, and still imprisoned
theyoungradical:

theneighbourhoodsuperhero:



Omar Khadr, a sixteen year old Guantanamo Bay detainee weeps uncontrollably, clutching at his face and hair as he calls out for his mother to save him from his torment. “Ya Ummi, Ya Ummi (Oh Mother, Oh Mother),” he wails repeatedly, hauntingly with each breath he takes.

The surveillance tapes, released by Khadr’s defence, show him left alone in an interrogation room for a “break” after he tried complaining to CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service) officers about his poor health due to insufficient medical attention. Ignoring his complaints and trying to get him to make false confessions, the officers get frustrated with the sixteen year old’s tears and tell him to get himself together by the time they come back from their break.
“You don’t care about me. Nobody cares about me,” he sobs to them.
The tapes show how the officers manipulated Khadr into thinking that they were helping him because they were also Canadian and how they taunted him with the prospect of home (Canada), (good) food, and familial reunion.
Khadr, a Canadian, was taken into US custody at the age of fifteen, tortured and refused medical attention because he wouldn’t attest to being a member of Al Qaeda, even though he was shot three times in the chest and had shrapnel embedded in his eyes and right shoulder. As a result, Khadr’s left eye is now permanently blind, the vision in his right eye is deteriorating, he develops severe pain in his right shoulder when the temperature drops, and he suffers from extreme nightmares.
He has been incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay since 2002, suffering extremely harsh interrogations and torture (methods), and is now 25 years old.


27 now, and still imprisoned

theyoungradical:

theneighbourhoodsuperhero:

Omar Khadr, a sixteen year old Guantanamo Bay detainee weeps uncontrollably, clutching at his face and hair as he calls out for his mother to save him from his torment. “Ya Ummi, Ya Ummi (Oh Mother, Oh Mother),” he wails repeatedly, hauntingly with each breath he takes.

The surveillance tapes, released by Khadr’s defence, show him left alone in an interrogation room for a “break” after he tried complaining to CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service) officers about his poor health due to insufficient medical attention. Ignoring his complaints and trying to get him to make false confessions, the officers get frustrated with the sixteen year old’s tears and tell him to get himself together by the time they come back from their break.

“You don’t care about me. Nobody cares about me,” he sobs to them.

The tapes show how the officers manipulated Khadr into thinking that they were helping him because they were also Canadian and how they taunted him with the prospect of home (Canada), (good) food, and familial reunion.

Khadr, a Canadian, was taken into US custody at the age of fifteen, tortured and refused medical attention because he wouldn’t attest to being a member of Al Qaeda, even though he was shot three times in the chest and had shrapnel embedded in his eyes and right shoulder. As a result, Khadr’s left eye is now permanently blind, the vision in his right eye is deteriorating, he develops severe pain in his right shoulder when the temperature drops, and he suffers from extreme nightmares.

He has been incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay since 2002, suffering extremely harsh interrogations and torture (methods), and is now 25 years old.

27 now, and still imprisoned

“The US deployed an excessive amount of military personnel to support the MINUSTAH security effort and justified this action through an exaggeration of the threat of looting and violence; however, the reality is that such incidences were sporadic and the preconceived notions of savagery served only to criminalize the victims who were in need of real humanitarian assistance, not law enforcement.”

There is no such thing as freedom in the abstract. There is a freedom to speak openly and iconoclastically, freedom to organize political opposition, freedom of opportunity to get an education and pursue a livelihood, freedom to worship as one chooses or not worship at all, freedom to live in healthful conditions, freedom to enjoy a various social benefits, and so on. Most of what is called freedom gets its definition within a social context. […]

U.S. policymakers argue that social revolutionary victory anywhere represents a diminution of freedom in the world. The assertion is false. The Chinese revolution did not crush democracy; there was none to crush in that oppressively feudal regime. The Cuban revolution did not destroy freedom; it destroyed a hateful U.S.-sponsored police state. The Algerian revolution did not abolish national liberties; precious few existed under French colonialism. The Vietnamese revolutionaries did not abrogate individual rights; no such rights were available under the U.S.-sponsored puppet governments of Bao Dai, Diem, and Ky.

Of course, revolutions do limit the freedoms of the corporate propertied class and other privileged interests: the freedom to invest privately without regard to human and environmental costs, the freedom to live in obscene opulence while paying workers starvation wages, the freedom to treat the state as a private agency in the service of a privileged coterie, the freedom to employ child labor and child prostitutes, the freedom to treat women as chattel, and so on.

— Michael Parenti, Blackshirts and Reds (via poststructur-al)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

Waska Tatay by Thomas Rousset & Raphaël Verona Waska Tatay by Thomas Rousset & Raphaël Verona Waska Tatay by Thomas Rousset & Raphaël Verona Waska Tatay by Thomas Rousset & Raphaël Verona Waska Tatay by Thomas Rousset & Raphaël Verona Waska Tatay by Thomas Rousset & Raphaël Verona Waska Tatay by Thomas Rousset & Raphaël Verona Waska Tatay by Thomas Rousset & Raphaël Verona